Sint Eustatius Netherlands Antilles History

It was 1954 when the Netherlands Antilles were created and dissolved in 2010 and became an autonomous territory of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. In 1954, it was the third largest island in the Caribbean after the Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Historically, Aruba was part of the Netherlands Antilles, an island federation with six islands that also included Curaçao, St. Martin, Sint Maarten, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the Dominican Republic and Haiti. On 1 January 1986 it became a separate entity within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and on 2 January 1987 Curacao and St. Martin joined as special parishes, which became "Aruba - St. Vincent & the Special Parish of Barbados" and "St. Martin Special Parish." After Curacsao and SINT Maarten were separated from the Netherlands Antilles in 1986 and declared an autonomous territory of the United States of America (USA) in 1990, they were merged into a "Kingdom of Holland" in 2010.

While other islands decided to leave the island and land in the Netherlands Antilles, the island council decided to become a special municipality of the Dutch Saba and Bonaire.

While other islands decided to leave the island, which meant that the Netherlands Antilles would be dissolved, the Island Council decided to become a public body of the Dutch Saba and Bonaire. Under Article 134 of the Dutch Constitution, Bonnaire, Saba and Sint Eustatius were added to the Netherlands as bijzondere gemeente ("special municipality") under Article 134.

The five island territories will continue to be allowed to enter, probably under a new name, the Joint Court of Justice. In total, the Kingdom's Law amending the Charter of the Kingdom of the Netherlands with regard to the dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles was ratified in the same year. This is based on the Treaty of St. Eustatius, concluded in 1954, which forms the basis for the current Treaty between the Netherlands and the United States of America and the European Union.

On 17 May 2010, the government received royal authorisation to incorporate the islands of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba into the Netherlands. Curacao and Sints Maarten received new constitutional structures, while Curacao, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Lucia, the United States of America, received new structures.

The Netherlands Antilles is part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, which also includes Aruba in the Netherlands. The Kingdom is a kingdom consisting of four islands: the islands of Sint Eustatius, Curacao, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sints Maarten and Saba, and the United States of America. Caribbean islands such as Barbados, Antigua and Barbuda and Sins Maartens vote with direct links to the Dutch, but are not part of the Dutch, thus forming a Caribbean part of the Netherlands and therefore not subject to their constitutional structure.

Meanwhile, the three remaining areas, Sint Eustatius, Curacao, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sints Maarten and Saba, are positioned more northward and harbor a culture that lays the foundation for today's islands of Barbados, Antigua and Barbuda and Sins Maartens. They are located in the southern part of the Netherlands Antilles, about 1,000 km from the mainland.

The remaining islands of Sint Eustatius, Curacao, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sints Maarten and Saba belong to the Netherlands Antilles, an archipelago that is mainly located in Europe and has about 1,500 inhabitants.

The constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands are Aruba and Sint Maarten, which actually comprise the islands Sints Eustatius, Curacao, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Saba. The Netherlands Antilles are part of a kingdom, the Netherlands, which includes the island of Aruban, which was separated from the Antilles on 1 January 1986. Before 1986, it was for a long time part of the Netherlands Antilles, but had its own status within that kingdom and now enjoys the same rights and privileges as the other countries that constituted it. On 2 January 1996, Ar Cuba, a small island with a population of about 500,000 people, was divided into the United States of America (USA) and then into a separate country, which separated it from all the Antilles.

On 10 October 2010, the organisation of the islands was dissolved and Saint Eustatius himself dissolved. The islands and regions of the Netherlands Antilles are still part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, but have a different legal status and are considered public bodies within the Netherlands, which means that they are under the direct administration of that country.

In 1954, the Netherlands Antilles were granted the right to be part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands under the Treaty of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. In 1999, Aruba seceded from the Kingdom of Belgium to form its own state, but it is still associated with the Kingdom of Belgium and is still under its direct administration.

More About Sint Eustatius

More About Sint Eustatius